Ovid: Tristia. Ex Ponto. (Loeb Classical Library, No. 151) by Ovid

By Ovid

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, forty three BCE–17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and legislations at Rome. Later he did substantial public provider there, and in a different way dedicated himself to poetry and to society. well-known before everything, he angry the emperor Augustus by means of his Ars Amatoria, and used to be banished due to this paintings and a few different cause unknown to us, and dwelt within the chilly and primitive city of Tomis at the Black Sea. He endured writing poetry, a kindly guy, top a temperate lifestyles. He died in exile. Ovid's major surviving works are the Metamorphoses, a resource of notion to artists and poets together with Chaucer and Shakespeare; the Fasti, a poetic therapy of the Roman yr of which Ovid entire merely part; the Amores, love poems; the Ars Amatoria, no longer ethical yet smart and in elements appealing; Heroides, fictitious love letters via mythical girls to absent husbands; and the dismal works written in exile: the Tristia, appeals to people together with his spouse and likewise the emperor; and comparable Epistulae ex Ponto. Poetry got here evidently to Ovid, who at his most sensible is energetic, photo and lucid. The Loeb Classical Library version of Ovid is in six volumes.

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Extra resources for Ovid: Tristia. Ex Ponto. (Loeb Classical Library, No. 151)

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E. D. 10 or 11 is meant, according as we interpret the passage to refer to two winters since the poet left Rome, or two passed in Tomis, cf. iv. 7. ). T. D. 11-12, cf. v. 10. e. in the winter, cf. D. D. 12). D. e. he is writing before that date. v. Cf. H. , 1883, Mommsen, xxxiv Provinces (Engl. ), i. p. 55. p. 15, and INTRODUCTION P. -iii. (i. P. 1) were published as a unit, cf. the proem and the epilogue (iii. 9) to Brutus. -iii. e. D. 12-13. D. is 13, 86. D. 12, cf. iii. 3. e. D. D. 13, cf. ii.

Me quoque, quae sensi, fateor lovis arma me reor infesto, cum tonat, igne peti. timere quicumque Argolica de classe Capherea fugit, l semper ab Euboicis vela retorsit aquis ; mea cumba semel vasta percussa procella ilium, quo laesa est, horret adire locum, ergo cave, liber, et timida circumspice m^nte> 85 et ut satis a media dum 90 sit tibi plebe legi. nimium sublimia peniiis 2 aequoreas nomine fecit aquas. petit infirmis Icarus, tarn en hinc, remis utaris an aura, consilium resque locusque dabunt.

D. 10-11. D. 10, cf. iv. 2. 2). e. D. 10, cf. iv. 6. e. D. 10 or 11 is meant, according as we interpret the passage to refer to two winters since the poet left Rome, or two passed in Tomis, cf. iv. 7. ). T. D. 11-12, cf. v. 10. e. in the winter, cf. D. D. 12). D. e. he is writing before that date. v. Cf. H. , 1883, Mommsen, xxxiv Provinces (Engl. ), i. p. 55. p. 15, and INTRODUCTION P. -iii. (i. P. 1) were published as a unit, cf. the proem and the epilogue (iii. 9) to Brutus. -iii. e. D. 12-13.

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